EFR - Review of Making Faces: Introspectacles - Free

Making Faces: Introspectacles - Free

Mon 8th – Sun 28th August 2011

reviews

Madeleine Stottor

at 10:13 on 13th Aug 2011

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Have you ever thought about cut flowers? Questioned the economic nous of Baa Baa Black Sheep? Or wondered what the true secret to happiness is? These are just a few of the big, if off-beat, ideas under the spotlight in ‘Making Faces: Introspectacle’, an hour-long Free Fringe comedy show. It bills itself as ‘award-giving’, combining stand-up, poetry, and music with amusing, endearing awkwardness. An easy hour spent in the company of Ed, Dan, and Lizzie is definitely one well-spent.

The three comics are immediately likeable, and their ability to cope with mess-ups like smashed beer glasses and a too-hard whack on the head make the audience warm to them all the more. Living up to their award-giving promise with certificates and photographs, they really engage with those watching. Although having someone in a top hat standing next to you repeating ‘Oh the potential’ in villainous tones is slightly unnerving, this ‘concept villain’ (because every Fringe show has one) is funny, as are examples of the worst time to sneeze, inappropriate reactions, and riffs on popular English nursery rhymes. Worth particular mention are the jumping poem, and the lament of the daffodil.

This show’s comfortable brand of awkward humour begins with its opening overly-prolonged ribbon-waving, and continues throughout. It’s peculiarly English comedy, references to ‘Pop goes the weasel’ and a ‘Farthing Wood unconscious’ passing over the Americans watchers slightly. But this never seems to hinder the audience’s enjoyment of the show. Closing as they begin, with a prolonged musical number, we are left with the sentiment that ‘believing is the only solution’, and as the audience laughs and claps along, you can tell that nobody (not even the American whose beer was smashed during an over-enthusiastic prize-giving) regrets attending. The show’s ‘odd oddments and endless endments’ might not be laugh-out-loud hilarious, but they are witty and clever, as the trio play on modern stereotypes and preconceptions to create a highly enjoyable hour of comedy.

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